As you'll see by the chart down below, the weather within the Maldives tends to be nearly identical throughout, regardless of the month. The days tend to be quite warm and at least somewhat humid. The nights are known for being reasonably warm and a bit balmy.

Unlike most other tropical destinations, the Maldives is unique in that it has two different “monsoon” periods each year. Luckily, neither are known for any dramatic weather or flooding, so the differences are rather subtle. Even during what we would consider the non-monsoon periods, there will be some infrequent rainfall, so the overall consistency is what is most striking for the potential visitor. The best times to visit the Maldives really depends on your goals. With that said, honestly the entire year is a good time if you can make it out there.

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Maldives monthly temperature averages and rainfall

January

 

  • High: 30°C/86°F
  • Low: 25°C/77°F
  • Rain: 76mm/3″

 

February

 

  • High: 30°C/86°F
  • Low: 26°C/78°F
  • Rain: 51mm/2″

 

March

 

  • High: 31°C/88°F
  • Low: 26°C/78°F
  • Rain: 74mm/2.9″

 

April

 

  • High: 31°C/88°F
  • Low: 26°C/79°F
  • Rain: 132mm/5.2″

 

May

 

  • High: 31°C/87°F
  • Low: 26°C/79°F
  • Rain: 216mm/8.5″

 

June

 

  • High: 30°C/86°F
  • Low: 26°C/78°F
  • Rain: 173mm/6.8″

 

July

 

  • High: 30°C/86°F
  • Low: 26°C/78°F
  • Rain: 147mm/5.8″

 

August

 

  • High: 30°C/86°F
  • Low: 25°C/77°F
  • Rain: 188mm/7.4″

 

September

 

  • High: 30°C/86°F
  • Low: 25°C/77°F
  • Rain: 244mm/9.6″

 

October

 

  • High: 30°C/86°F
  • Low: 25°C/77°F
  • Rain: 221mm/8.7″

 

November

 

  • High: 30°C/86°F
  • Low: 25°C/77°F
  • Rain: 201mm/7.9″

 

December

 

  • High: 29°C/85°F
  • Low: 25°C/77°F
  • Rain: 231mm/9.1″

Dry season and wet season

The dry season in the Maldives typically lasts from mid December through and into early May, but the beginning and ending times do change some from year to year. The Northeast Monsoon season actually occurs between November and March, but of course most of this is during “dry season” and due to this, it’s no surprise that the monsoon rarely amounts to anything more than a quick downpour that occurs a couple times a week.

 

The rainy season in the Maldives runs from early May through and into mid December, with the Southwest Monsoon season officially being both the months of July and August. Again, the rainfall totals don’t actually vary much at all, and the chances of a major storm are almost zero. The Maldives water villas are all built very well and specifically to comfortably handle normal conditions in the area, so you shouldn’t worry about any storm dangers.

 

Olhuveli Resort Maldives

Cloudbursts and sunshine

Typical of the tropics, when it rains in the Maldives it tends to come down heavily for a short time and then clear up just as quickly as it came. Even during the “dry season” it’s not uncommon for the day to start with a sunny morning and then turn with thick clouds that roll in, generally speaking, in the afternoon, with 30 minutes of heavy showers after that, and then a clear evening that matches the morning.

 

During the rainy season it tends to rain a little more during the night, which means that the actual daytime rain that visitors see is even more consistent than it first appears. Even during the rainy season it’s rare to have more than a few cloudy days each week, so it would be very bad luck to see a lot of gray during an average visit.


Humidity

It will be relatively humid all year in the Maldives, and those coming from a cold climate may feel slightly uncomfortable during the first day or two, but nearly everyone enjoys that special tropical feeling after that. Also, the temperature itself never strays much above the averages, so even the high humidity is never unbearable like it can be in Mediterranean Europe.


Winds

Because the Maldives is strung through a large portion of the beautiful Indian Ocean, there will be steady winds crossing through your overwater resort pretty much at all times. The wind can and will change direction, but it’s almost never still. This means that even on hot days you’ll still be cooled down by a tropical breeze.

 

This steady breeze is yet another reason to choose a water villa instead of a beach villa if you’re able to. This is because most of the overwater villas located here have private terraces on two or more edges, which means you’ll always have access to the breeze if you like, something not always true of the island rooms that are sheltered with palm trees and other buildings.

 

Source: Weather.com

 

Top photo courtesy of thadu83 on Flickr


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10 thoughts on "Adults-only Maldives: Water villa resorts with no children"

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  1. Thank goodness – people talking sense about this issue! I hope in future more resorts for adults only will open.

  2. I noticed these comments were posted before the adults-only resort I’m staying at next year opened, but one does exist now! Thank you for posting it in a different list on this site. I’m going on my honeymoon and was very particular about choosing a resort that would be peaceful.

  3. I totally agree
    Being a teacher, I work with kids all the time. There are times I don’t want to see or hear them at all. I’m happy to pay top dollar for the luxury, peace and quiet so why should I feel guilty for not wanting kids around?

    1. Nino,

      I agree. Some people are sensitive about this subject and that’s why I mentioned it at the top, but I think the majority of people agree with us that adults should have the freedom to spend a holiday without little kids around if we like. Thank you. -Roger

  4. I don’t understand why you’re pussy-footing around and making this a "sensitive" subject. Kids are noisy and disruptive at resorts. Many people don’t want to holiday with children around. The only people who are upset by this are parents who think their little darlings are so wonderful that everyone loves them. Wrong.

    We’re a couple with time and money and we seek-out resorts with no guests under 16 (or preferably under-18). There’s no shame in that, and there’s no need to be shy about promoting it.

    1. I totally agree with you. I avoid anywhere where there are likely to be kids as they completely ruin the ambience and peace and we pay top dollar for a break and don’t deserve having to put up with other people’s problem brats.