Luckily, for those planning a trip, you'll find that daytime and evening temperatures in Tahiti, as well as throughout the entirety of French Polynesia, are incredibly stable from month to month. You'll see on the temperature chart below that each day of the year is almost identical to the other days. Moorea Island is only 9 miles (17 km) away, so the climate and weather are basically identical, and there are better Moorea overwater bungalow resorts to consider as well.

Because these averages are so reliable, you don't need to worry about checking the forecast during the days leading up to your trip. The highest recorded highs are only a tiny bit above the average, and it's the same story with the record lows.

For helpful climate information see below the temperature chart

Contents [Show]

Tahiti monthly temperature averages and rainfall

January

 

  • High: 86°F/32°C
  • Low: 73°F/22°C
  • Rain: 9.9″/252mm

 

February

 

  • High: 86°F/32°C
  • Low: 73°F/22°C
  • Rain: 9.6″/244mm

 

March

 

  • High: 90°F/32°C
  • Low: 72°F/22°C
  • Rain: 16.9″/429mm

 

April

 

  • High: 90°F/32°C
  • Low: 72°F/22°C
  • Rain: 5.6″/142mm

 

May

 

  • High: 88°F/31°C
  • Low: 70°F/21°C
  • Rain: 4.0″/102mm

 

June

 

  • High: 86°F/30°C
  • Low: 70°F/21°C
  • Rain: 3.0″/76mm

 

July

 

  • High: 86°F/30°C
  • Low: 68°F/20°C
  • Rain: 2.1″/53mm

 

August

 

  • High: 86°F/30°C
  • Low: 68°F/20°C
  • Rain: 1.7″/43mm

 

September

 

  • High: 86°F/30°C
  • Low: 70°F/21°C
  • Rain: 2.1″/53mm

 

October

 

  • High: 88°F/31°C
  • Low: 70°F/21°C
  • Rain: 3.5″/89mm

 

November

 

  • High: 88°F/31°C
  • Low: 70°F/21°C
  • Rain: 5.9″/150mm

 

December

 

  • High: 88°F/31°C
  • Low: 70°F/21°C
  • Rain: 9.8″/249mm

Dry season and wet season

As you’ll find with everywhere else in the tropics, there are two seasons instead of the typical four. The “wet season” in Tahiti lasts from November through April, with the wettest month being March. The “dry season” runs from May into October, with the driest month being August.

 

You’ll also notice on the chart below that there’s still some predictable rain during the “dry season” so it’s never truly dry.


Cloudbursts rather than drizzle

While the rainfall totals for the wet season months might look like they’d be a problem, in reality it’s rarely a worry at all. Just as with elsewhere in the tropics, rainfall in Tahiti tends to come in severe cloudbursts that usually last only 30 minutes or so, usually up to an hour. This often happens in the late afternoon, sometimes on a daily basis, but it also happens in the early morning darkness.

 

Even during the wet season, you’ll find that it’s usually sunny most of the time. Then you’ll see clouds rolling in quickly, and they’ll produce a heavy downpour that lasts a short while. An hour later it’s often sunny again, though there are some periods when the gray does persist a bit longer.

Humidity

Humidity tends to be on the high side throughout the entire year, with discomfort peaking from January and into March, but honestly there’s little difference from one month to the next, and it’s still quite humid in dry season.


Winds

The “trade winds” like to say hello every day of the year, and tend to be more prominent in the afternoon than in the morning. Fortunately though, these winds tend to be very pleasant and cooling. Making it so you’ll likely feel that the temperatures are perfect for an island paradise as long as you are outdoors.

 

Most restaurants and bars in the South Pacific are outdoors and shaded, so very few people complain about the weather at all. Any indoor restaurant at any of the Tahiti overwater bungalow resorts will be air conditioned as well.

 

Climate source: BBC Weather


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6 thoughts on "34 Best photos of overwater bungalows in Bora Bora, Moorea, and Tahiti"

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  1. Interested in an over the water bungalow. We would like to be able to snorkel off of the bungalow. Suggestions??????????????????

    1. Gail,

      You can snorkel off the deck at almost every overwater bungalow in the world, except for a few of the cheaper options in Malaysia. That said, the best snorkeling in those same areas is usually done with a boat trip to a nearby reef. Since the bungalows are mostly over clear lagoons, there isn’t as much to see right under the bungalow itself. -Roger

    1. Cynthia,

      These photos are off the official resort websites, and some of those are offered in high resolution, but only a few of them. The resorts own the images as well. -Roger

        1. Philip,

          The plumbing is built in just below the floor. These rooms have everything, including A/C and cable TV, not to mention showers and baths. -Roger